Archives for category: holes

Documentation of piece in progress on the walls of my studio space in the Orpheus building in the Belfast school of art. The building is to be demolished in June.

wall wall1 wall2 wall3 wall4 wall5 wall6

I set myself the parameters of only using black conte crayon to trace, and pencil to transfer marks. Traced marks were only to be from sources present in the MFA studio environment, such as cracks in the floor and plasterwork and stains from spilt paint. The majority of marks come from traced knots in plywood boards. I like their shapes, and on a deeper level am intrigued by how they mark the passage of time and growth of the trees that were used to make the wood.

The tracings are transferred to the wall several times, the marks become fainter each time. Sometimes the pieces of tracing paper are loaded with crayon again to achieve a darker line. It is a fragile and delicate material to use, it often rips when a sharp point of a pencil passes across it.

I joined several pieces of wood together that I had drilled, hacked and otherwise distressed.

One red lamp and long exposures create the impression of the room being bathed in a red, somehow primordial glow.

The assembled, glowing structure appears like some kind of hive ready to crack open to ooze lava.

hive2house

I’ve been working directly on to the walls of my studio space in Cathedral Studios. It has been a liberating and exciting process. I’ve continued the marks on to the floor and the ceiling, which encourages the viewer to feel that they are ‘in’ the work; to relate to the scale of the work with the size of their own body. The work has gradually grown over the past few weeks. Part of the feeling of freedom comes from the awareness that the piece can only be transitory. Ultimately it will be painted over, only to exist in photographs and memory.

This makes documentation especially important, though it is wholly inadequate in terms of experiencing the work. I have often thought this when looking at installation or performance art. Immediacy, sensory stimulation and interaction cannot be translated into a two dimensional image or video.

Walls:

wall piece 1

wall piece 2

wp3

 

wp5

wp6

wp7

wpf

Ceiling

wpc

Floor

wpf2

wpf3

 

scored

I obliterated an old piece of work scoring with knives, drilling and gouging the surface. I like that it looks like the bi-product of  another process.

The same method has been applied to a piece of MDF primed with grey paint below.

scored panel 2

le mer et de l'air

 

bombard

 

This is a small recent piece which employs the pastel palette I have favoured lately. The bomber suggests threat. Holes could be for rivets or made by bullets. The fragility and transience of all existence is implicit.

Anything built can be destroyed.

au bord de la mer

adrift

bfic

White-Out

This piece was one of three that comprised my degree show in the summer of 2003.  It measures about 6 and a half by 5 feet and I consider it one of the most successful pieces I’ve ever made.

I traced marks I inflicted on wooden boards with axes, drills and hammers then painstakingly transferred the tracings to canvas. It was a slow process to build up the cluster of marks which concentrate in the bottom right corner. At this time I was discovering the power of negative space, I think it’s very important to the overall feel. I used white radiator paint around the edges and gloss paint for the vestiges of white on the left hand side of the canvas.

The work resembles old maps,  cave paintings, cells seen under a microscope or a diagram of organic growth. It was selected for the Royal Ulster Academy show that year and sold to the Northern Ireland Department for the Environment. I sometimes wonder where it has ended up, or if it still exists and what the people who see it make of it.

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