Archives for category: belfast

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I was pleased to be asked to do a wall drawing in the vault artist studios members’ room, formerly the reception area of Tower Street Belfast Met. Pool table, leather sofa and bespoke bar are out of shot.

I’m not certain it is finished, if I work more layers on it I’ll post up the results.

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These are finished in the sense that any art work ever is. I could keep working at them adding more layers but judge it’s time to paint over them and start again.

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drawing 1

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Drawing 2

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Blue Whale are thrilled to have moved in to Vault Artist Studios, alongside almost 90 other creative practitioners. I did a bit of decorating of the outside of our space tonight.

 

 

This is the full performance I made on the opening night of The Melody of Dust exhibition. The performance followed a pre-determined ‘recipe’ score that provided a loose structure for what to play during each section. The score allows for improvisation within parameters, ensuring that each performance will be different.

It was kindly filmed by Colm Clarke, who curated the show with Tonya McMullan.

 

I created this wall drawing by working directly onto the wall of Pollen studios in Belfast. The wall surface was rough and full of character, showing evidence of many past exhibitions in the space.

My performance set-up, utilising both electronic and analogue kit components, a loop station and a Marshall Amplifier remained in the space after my performance on the opening night, as sculptural presences.

Wall Drawing, Pollen Studios.

 

 

 

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I recently participated in The Melody of Dust exhibition, creating a site specific wall drawing and performing a new 20 minute sound art piece on the opening night.

The exhibition was in Pollen Studios Belfast and billed as an “Exhibition of two emerging Belfast talents whose work explores organic forms, traces and movement” and was curated by Colm Clarke & Tonya McMullan (CCTM)

CCTM

Colm Clarke and Tonya McMullan (CCTM) work collaboratively as artists, curators and urban farmers. Their projects are site specific and responsive, including one day curatorial projects, artist run initiatives and interventions in the city.

http://cctmprojects.tumblr.com

Jasmin Marker is a Belfast-based, German born interdisciplinary artist who works primarily with members of the microbial kingdoms. Engaging with a variety of biocultures she seeks analogies to societal cultures, exploring relevant scientific and anthropological concepts and their philosophical paradigms. While her research originates from a dedication to environmentalism and sustainability it extends deeper into questioning the evolution of human psychology. Jasmin graduated from University of Ulster with a Bachelor in Fine Art in 2016, where she has completed a graduate residency in 2017. Since she has exhibited in various galleries in Northern Ireland including PS2 Gallery (March 2017), Catalyst Arts (October 2017) and currently shows as part of the group show Kills 99,9% of Bacteria at CCA Derry:Londonderry.

John Macormac (b.1981) is an artist living and working in Northern Ireland and a current co-director at Catalyst Arts. He has recently graduated from the University of Ulster with an MFA in Fine Art. John helped establish Cathedral Studios, a Belfast based artist run studio organisation in 2003. His art practice is multi-disciplinary, embracing performance, installation and drawing.

 John Macormac is a recipient of a Support for the Individual Artist Programme award from the Arts Council of Northern Ireland

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I made these two geometric chalk on board pieces as a commission for Art Loves. They are both 110cm squared and to be hung as a diptych.

 

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I painted this wall piece for our second year MFA interim group show in Catalyst Arts gallery last week. The exhibition ran from the evening of Thursday the seventh of January to Saturday the ninth. The wall was repainted white on Sunday. The piece is composed of the ‘double E’ shape I have been using recently repeated in an interlocking pattern. One side is the colour inversion of the other side.

I performed a sonic art piece on the night, where I played live drums along to pre-recorded simple drum patterns. These had been recorded with a metronome and increased in speed by ten beats per minute with each pattern. Each of the nine sections was exactly one minute long.

I limited drums used in both recording and performance to bass drum, hi-hat and snare drum. This minimal approach was in keeping with the minimal palette used on the wall. I wrote a set of rules that loosely governed what I would play for each section:

1, 80BPM Bass drum/stick clicks

2, 90 BPM Bass drum/snare rims

3, 100 BPM Bass drum/hi-hats

4, 110BPM Bass drum/snare (snare off)/hi-hat accents

5, 120BPM Bass drum/snare (snare on)/ hi-hat 16th notes

6, 130 BPM Bass drum/snare/hi-hat/snare rims

7, 140BPM Bass drum/snare (ghost notes)/hi-hat

8,150 BPM Bass drum/snare (note every whole beat)/hi-hat

9, 160 BPM Bass drum/snare/hi hat.

Here is a video clip of the last 3 sections of the performance. It goes out of time with what is played through the amp towards the end. I like the intense, polyrhythmic feel this creates.

The bass drum in front of the work: I tried documenting the piece in various configurations.

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The piece with bass drum and amplifier.

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I’ve been playing with digital variations on the ‘charged’ shape from the last post, I’m working towards a gallery installation early next month that will be painted directly on to the walls. The installation will involve repetition and variation of the colour of the shape.

These digital renderings are extremely crude, but provide a sound means of testing ideas.

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I presented this painted black gloss shape on black matte wall at a recent studio critique. It was accompanied by this sound piece, played through a powerful stereo:

It was sufficiently loud that it caused objects within the room to vibrate.

The group discussion read the combination of sound and visuals as being oppressive and ominous, combining to create an atmosphere suggestive of religious cult rituals or sinister political gatherings.

It was felt that the work presented in this crit represents a departure from previous work. The black gloss symbol has nothing of the organic, gentle feel of the pencil drawings. It is extremely assertive and dogmatic; very oppositional and uncompromising in every way, to the point of feeling threatening. It suggests none of the time based creative process of the pencil drawing.

I am gradually assessing where I go from here. The shape is just an arrangement of painted lines, although I can understand why it was interpreted in these ways. I do feel that playing with sound and visuals with a certain charge and potency has potential, though I want to find ways to puncture the pomposity these signifiers carry, to promote recognition of their ultimate absurdity.

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